Things i like
mothefro:

icykynite:

reikaoki:

maimishou:

magicalgirlfanproblems:

The gross racism and whitewashing of the international cures in Happiness Charge.

That’s funny. Last I checked the international Cures did look like they were from their countries of origin and were generally darker skinned than the Japanese Cures. Just because they’re not as dark as you want them to be doesn’t mean they are being whitewashed. The OP and those who agree need to get a grip.

These are the Cures from India

This is the Cure from France

These are the Cures from the USA

This is the Cure from Egypt

Every single Cure we see captured: from Sydney, Madrid, Moscow, Rome, London, etc…are just as pale as the examples shown.
And these are our main, Japanese, Cures.

Yeah, “they have darker skin,” my ass.

As a tan-skinned Japanese viewer that watched with sheer horror at seeing the whitewashing of the international Cures in India and Egypt: THANK YOU! I thought I was the only one that was disgusted with seeing this!(Japan actually does have a HUGE problem with emphasizing white skin as the ideal beauty standards, and this is due to western white imperialism).

The white skin beauty idea has been a belief throughout Asia (including Japan) long before Western imperialism. White skin in Japan dates back to the Nara period (also if you look at ukiyo-e art you’ll see most of the women have white skin) and it’s even discussed in the classic novel “The Tale of Genji” (the oldest novel in Japan which was written in the 11th century by a woman, Murasaki Shikibu). Whitening the skin in Japan has existed for a thousand years and that is a beauty standard that has been traced back to Confucius (white skin equated wealth/nobility and tanned skin meant poor/commoner who had to work outdoors, so it didn’t equate to anti-blackness like Western imperialism did/does).

mothefro:

icykynite:

reikaoki:

maimishou:

magicalgirlfanproblems:

The gross racism and whitewashing of the international cures in Happiness Charge.

That’s funny. Last I checked the international Cures did look like they were from their countries of origin and were generally darker skinned than the Japanese Cures. Just because they’re not as dark as you want them to be doesn’t mean they are being whitewashed. The OP and those who agree need to get a grip.

These are the Cures from India

This is the Cure from France

These are the Cures from the USA

This is the Cure from Egypt

Every single Cure we see captured: from Sydney, Madrid, Moscow, Rome, London, etc…are just as pale as the examples shown.

And these are our main, Japanese, Cures.

Yeah, “they have darker skin,” my ass.

As a tan-skinned Japanese viewer that watched with sheer horror at seeing the whitewashing of the international Cures in India and Egypt: THANK YOU! I thought I was the only one that was disgusted with seeing this!
(Japan actually does have a HUGE problem with emphasizing white skin as the ideal beauty standards, and this is due to western white imperialism).

The white skin beauty idea has been a belief throughout Asia (including Japan) long before Western imperialism. White skin in Japan dates back to the Nara period (also if you look at ukiyo-e art you’ll see most of the women have white skin) and it’s even discussed in the classic novel “The Tale of Genji” (the oldest novel in Japan which was written in the 11th century by a woman, Murasaki Shikibu). Whitening the skin in Japan has existed for a thousand years and that is a beauty standard that has been traced back to Confucius (white skin equated wealth/nobility and tanned skin meant poor/commoner who had to work outdoors, so it didn’t equate to anti-blackness like Western imperialism did/does).

shadowblinder:

Stop condemning female characters for having the exact same traits that your favorite male characters have.

unwinona:

ninjasexfarty:

Important, always-relevant comic done by the wonderful Ursa Eyer.

THIS THIS THIS


a:tla 30 day challenge → day 25: favorite friendship
katara and toph

a:tla 30 day challenge  day 25: favorite friendship

katara and toph

lordbape:

no one’s saying it’s bad that jon stewart is telling people about racism, it’s not bad that white people are hearing jon stewart say it as a white person, but it is worth criticizing and thinking critically about the implications of it. and it is important to be bringing up the…

septembriseur:

A while back, there was a justified kerfuffle when David Goyer, renowned human trashcan, ran his mouth off about how She-Hulk was created to be a kind of sex super-object, ownable only by the Hulk. This isn’t the case, of course, but I’ve found myself thinking about that attitude in regards to a lot of other things— most of all the issue of fridging.

"Fridging" is the term we use to talk about the killing-off of female characters for the sole purpose of creating drama for men. Lately I’ve idly wondered whether there ought to be an related term for the killing-off of children. This occurred to me in the context of Rick Remender’s Captain America, but it comes up in numerous other places; it seems to be less common and more dramatic than the killing-off of women. If killing a woman isn’t dramatic enough, you can step it up and kill a child. 

I say that the word for killing off children would be related to the word for killing off women because both actions involve taking something from a man. When fridging happens, we aren’t meant to be sad for the woman— to feel that death is her loss, her suffering. Her suffering belongs to the man. We are meant to mourn not her, but rather the fact that a man has lost something he values. He has lost a cherished possession.

Read More

tastefullyoffensive:

[@robfee]

septembriseur:

A while back, there was a justified kerfuffle when David Goyer, renowned human trashcan, ran his mouth off about how She-Hulk was created to be a kind of sex super-object, ownable only by the Hulk. This isn’t the case, of course, but I’ve found myself thinking about that attitude in regards to a lot of other things— most of all the issue of fridging.

"Fridging" is the term we use to talk about the killing-off of female characters for the sole purpose of creating drama for men. Lately I’ve idly wondered whether there ought to be an related term for the killing-off of children. This occurred to me in the context of Rick Remender’s Captain America, but it comes up in numerous other places; it seems to be less common and more dramatic than the killing-off of women. If killing a woman isn’t dramatic enough, you can step it up and kill a child. 

I say that the word for killing off children would be related to the word for killing off women because both actions involve taking something from a man. When fridging happens, we aren’t meant to be sad for the woman— to feel that death is her loss, her suffering. Her suffering belongs to the man. We are meant to mourn not her, but rather the fact that a man has lost something he values. He has lost a cherished possession.

Read More

tastefullyoffensive:

[@robfee]